Monthly Archives: August 2014

Washington Redskins Defend Name With Help From Native Americans

TIME

The Washington Redskins premiered a video Monday in which Native Americans explain why they don’t think the team’s hot-button name is offensive.

The video, released by the “Redskins Facts” campaign reportedly funded by the team, features Native Americans from across the country arguing that the moniker is “a powerful name — it’s a warrior’s name.”

This counters the message of a powerful ad paid for by the California tribe Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation during the June NBA Finals called Proud to Be, in which a voiceover said, “Native Americans call themselves many things. The one thing they don’t…” before flashing to an image of a Redskins helmet.

In the Redskins Facts video, Native Americans argue that they have bigger issues to deal with than a football team’s name. “They’ve never asked Native Americans. It’s somebody else who knows nothing about us trying to speak for us, and it’s…

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Listen to Robin Williams Talk About His Struggles on a 2010 Podcast

TIME

Robin Williams, who died Monday at age 63, opened up about his struggles with addiction and depression on Marc Maron’s WTF Podcast in April of 2010. Following the news of Williams’ passing, Maron once again shared his interview with the comic legend — an interview he said “changed many people’s perception of Robin Williams.”

“What was amazing about Robin Williams is that he has this sort of electric, shining piece of humanity, whose entire life on stage was to entertain thoroughly and with a type of presence that nobody has ever seen before,” Maron said in an emotional new introduction to the interview. “There’s nobody who wasn’t touched by it.”

During the conversation, Williams spoke about his alcoholism and his relapse in the mid-2000s.

“I think it’s trying to fill the hole,” Williams said. “It’s fear, and you’re kind of going, what am I doing in my career? And you…

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Richard Dawkins Remembers Robin Williams’ Poetic Comic Genius

TIME

I met him only once. It was June 3, 2006, at the Academy of Achievement dinner in Los Angeles. After dinner, at the end of the conference, there was a loud band and dancing (Archbishop Desmond Tutu delightfully prominent among the dancers), and Sheryl Crow was the singer.

Suddenly Robin Williams hurtled unannounced, unrehearsed onto the stage. Sheryl Crow graciously (and with good-natured surprise) gave up the microphone to him and stood by. He treated us to an exuberant impromptu performance, delivering verse reports on most, if not all, of the speeches we had been listening to during the conference. He deftly summarized each of the lectures in a rhyming couplet (sometimes in the special rap sense of rhyming). Then, after stepping back for a few seconds’ thought while the band played on, he would advance to the front of the stage with a new verse about the next lecture…

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Death Toll in Southern China Quake Rises to 589

Verizon: Slowing Data Speeds for Some Users Is Necessary

TIME

Verizon has defended its policy of slowing data speeds for some users after receiving stinging criticism from the Federal Communications Commission.

After receiving a letter from the FCC condemning the policy last week, the telecom company said slowing speeds—known as “throttling”—for heavy users of unlimited data plans during high traffic periods is necessary to ensure network quality, according to the Wall Street Journal.

The FCC’s letter followed Verizon’s July 25 announcement that under its “network optimization policy,” customers with 4G LTE devices on unlimited data plans who are in the top 5 percent of data users “may experience slower data speeds when using certain high bandwidth applications.”

“It is disturbing to me that Verizon Wireless would base its ‘network management’ on distinctions among its customers’ data plans, rather than on network architecture or technology,” wrote FCC chairman Tom Wheeler. “I know of no past Commission statement that would treat…

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