Daily Archives: February 27, 2015

Why Leonard Nimoy Mattered

A formative part of my childhood! And watched Star Trek TOS with my father. Never missed it…

TIME

If you cared a fig for space travel, it was easy to not to care when the first episode of Star Trek aired on Sept. 8, 1966. Just four days later, after all, Pete Conrad and Dick Gordon would be blasting off on their Gemini XI mission, which would orbit the earth 44 times in just under three days and set a then-unheard of manned-altitude record of 739 nautical miles (1,369 km). There was still one more Gemini flight to go before NASA could even think of test-flying its Apollo lunar ships—and only a little more than three years left if the U.S. was going to meet President Kennedy’s goal of reaching the moon before 1970.

Against that, a group of actors on a paste-board set pretending to fly in space was pretty small beer. And as for one with the blunt-cut bangs and pointy rubber ears? Please.

But the…

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How to Watch Leonard Nimoy’s Most Memorable Performances Online

Must watch all of them, everything; I even have his books of poetry, and of course those biographies: .”I Am / Am Not Spock” Guess I could write “Almost a Trekkie” (concealed life of an Mixed American Teenager” –always liked that Mr. Spock was mixed: Vulcan and Human; Intellect and Emotion –in some ways. I identify with that…

TIME

Leonard Nimoy, who died at the age of 83 on Feb. 27, left behind a long and memorable career of performances that stretched from Earth throughout the final frontier of space.

Much of that work can now be revisited for longtime fans or seen for the first time for those looking to see some of Nimoy’s best work. Here are some of the essential performances that can be found on Netflix, Amazon Prime, and more.

Star Trek
Available on: Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime
Nimoy’s most iconic role is, of course, as Spock in the many incarnations of the Star Trek franchise. Thankfully, all three seasons of the original series that made Spock and the Vulcan Salute household names can be found on most major streaming services. For one of Spock’s best outings, try season two’s premiere, “Amok Time;” it’s an incredible example of Nimoy’s work on the show.

Star Trek…

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See Leonard Nimoy’s Long and Prosperous Life in Photos

Menu of living long and prospering

TIME

[time-brightcove videoid=4084333496001]

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How Leonard Nimoy Almost Wasn’t Spock

Say it ain’t so! –even though it is….

TIME

News of the death of actor Leonard Nimoy will invariably mention the role for which he was most famous, that of Spock on Star Trek. Nimoy and Spock have been mentioned in the same breath for almost exactly 50 years now, and that’s also as long as he has been loved for the role, even when he wasn’t actively involved in a Star Trek project (and even despite calling his first autobiography I Am NotSpock). In fact, the actor’s very first mention in the pages of TIME was in a 1975 article about how the show’s fan culture had picked up after the cancellation of the original series.

But that pairing of actor and role almost didn’t happen.

As TIME recounted in a 1994 cover story about Star Trek (around the time of Star Trek: Generations, the franchise’s seventh feature film, in which Nimoy did not appear)…

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Leonard Nimoy’s Final Tweet Will Make You Cry

I’m already crying,.. Showing emotion; not a good Vulcan at all.

TIME

Leonard Nimoy, who won over an obsessive fan-base with his logical, pointy-eared Mr. Spock on Star Trek, died on Feb. 27. He was 83.

His final tweet from Monday was exceptionally poignant:

Nimoy signed all his tweets “LLAP” or “Live Long and Prosper,” his character’s catchphrase from the Star Trek series and films.

Nimoy had announced via Twitter last year that he had been diagnosed with COPD, a chronic respiratory disease caused by smoking that has no cure. He encouraged his followers to stop smoking.

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Leonard Nimoy, Who Played Spock on Star Trek, Dies at 83

No!!! Not on my birthday! Not ever! Guess that Mr. Spock is now linked to me; I’ll take that like any other medicine!!!!

TIME

Leonard Nimoy, the actor who played Spock on Star Trek, died Friday. He was 83 and had lung disease, the New York Times reports.

Nimoy was most famous for his role as the Vulcan Spock on the Star Trek TV show in 1966. He would also later appear in J.J Abrams’ Star Trek reboot movies.

“In Spock, I finally found the best of both worlds: to be widely accepted in public approval and yet be able to continue to play the insulated alien through the Vulcan character,” he once wrote of playing the role.

[NYT]

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Five Best Ideas of the Day: February 27